Friday, June 23, 2017

Correctional Officer Assaulted at Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility

SAN DIEGO – Two correctional officers were treated and released from a local hospital after being attacked by an inmate Wednesday at Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility (RJD).

At around 1 p.m. June 21, a correctional officer was escorting inmate Lucious Wilson, 38, out of a building when Wilson lunged at the officer and began punching him in the face. The officer immediately began to defend himself from Wilson’s attack and attempted to strike back with his own fists. Other staff in the area observed the attack and immediately ran over to assist in restraining Wilson. After a struggle on the ground, the officers were able to subdue and restrain the inmate.

During the altercation, the officer sustained injuries to his facial area, including a puncture wound to his lip. A responding officer sustained an injury to his knee. Both officers were transported to an outside medical facility for treatment and have since been released. Inmate Wilson did not sustain any serious injuries and was placed in short-term restricted housing.

Wilson was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation on July 10, 2012, from Los Angeles County to serve a 13-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon by a second striker and brandishing a deadly weapon.

RJD opened in 1987 and houses approximately 3,807 minimum-, medium, and maximum-security inmates. There are currently 1,906 staff members working at the institution. RJD’s primary mission is to provide long-term housing and professional rehabilitative services for inmates of all custody levels. Additionally, RJD is a designated institution for inmates with severe mental illness, inmates with developmental disabilities and is responsible for providing officer coverage for inmates being treated in community hospitals throughout San Diego County. Education and career technical skills are offered to inmates through academic classes, vocational instruction, and work programs to create viable job skills that are marketable in today's workforce.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 22, 2017      
 

CONTACT: Lt. Jennifer Davies  
(619) 661-7802

 



Thursday, June 15, 2017

Inmate Mistakenly Released From Sacramento County Jail Apprehended in Sacramento

SACRAMENTO — State prison inmate Alamar Houston, who was mistakenly released from Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) custody June 13, was apprehended early Thursday morning by agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Services Unit and SCSO Major Crimes Bureau.

Houston was sent out to court in Sacramento County from CDCR to face charges of vehicle theft and receiving stolen property last month. He had been housed at Sacramento County Jail while in the custody of local authorities. 

CDCR had an active detainer on Houston, so that he would be returned to CDCR custody after the court proceedings. Instead, on June 13 after Houston’s court case was dismissed, he was mistakenly released by SCSO.

The ongoing investigation on inmate Houston’s release from SCSO led CDCR agents to the area of the 1100 block of C Street in Sacramento. Agents observed Houston walking down the street, and not at a specific location or residence; he was taken into custody without incident. At around 12:15 a.m. June 15 he was returned to Deuel Vocational Institution (DVI) in Tracy, where he had been housed until his transfer to Sacramento County Jail.

Houston was received by CDCR from Yolo County on Jan. 12, 2017, to serve a 35-year sentence for vehicle theft, evading a peace officer while driving recklessly, hit-and-run causing injury to another person, and assault with a deadly weapon.


Contact:
CDCR: Krissi Khokhobashvili, (916) 445-4950
SCSO: Tony Turnbull, (916) 874-5021

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Inmate Mistakenly Released From Sacramento County Jail


SACRAMENTO — California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) officials are looking for Alamar Houston, 40, a state prison inmate who was mistakenly released from Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office custody on June 13.

Houston was sent out to court in Sacramento County from CDCR to face charges of vehicle theft and receiving stolen property last month. He had been housed at Sacramento County Jail while in the custody of local authorities.

CDCR had an active detainer on Houston, so that he would be returned to CDCR custody after the court proceedings. Instead, on June 13 after Houston’s court case was dismissed, he was mistakenly released by the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office. Agents from CDCR’s Special Services Unit and SCSO’s Major Crimes Unit were immediately dispatched to locate and apprehend Houston.

Houston was received by CDCR from Yolo County on Jan. 12, 2017, to serve a 35-year sentence for vehicle theft, evading a peace officer while driving recklessly, hit-and-run causing injury to another person, and assault with a deadly weapon. Until his transfer to Sacramento County Jail, Houston was housed at Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy.

Houston is an African American man with brown hair and hazel eyes. He is 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighs 262 pounds. Anybody who sees Houston or has any knowledge of his whereabouts should immediately call 911.

Contact:
CDCR: Krissi Khokhobashvili, (916) 445-4950
SCSO: Tony Turnbull, (916) 874-5021

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Offender Who Walked Away from San Diego Reentry Facility Apprehended

SAN DIEGO — A man who walked away from the Male Community Reentry Program (MCRP) in San Diego County on May 11, 2017, was apprehended Friday. 

Israel Hernandez, 27, was apprehended at 4 p.m. May 26 by agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Service Unit (SSU) in the city of San Ysidro, located in San Diego County. He was taken into custody without incident and transported to Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego.

Hernandez had been participating in the MCRP, which allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the reentry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for male offenders who have approximately 365 days left to serve. The program links participants to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Hernandez was received by CDCR from San Diego County in November 2016 with a two-year, eight-month sentence for vehicle theft as a second striker. Hernandez was transferred to the MCRP in San Diego in March. He was scheduled to be released to probation in March 2018.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

CDCR Inmate Firefighter Dies of Injuries

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that an inmate firefighter has died as the result of injuries sustained while working in Humboldt County.

The firefighter, Matthew Beck, 26, was leading a crew that was clearing brush in the Hoopa area. He suffered major head, neck and back injuries yesterday when a large, 120-foot tall tree nearby uprooted and fell on him. He died before life-flight crews were able to reach him due to the remoteness of the accident scene.

“We are saddened by the death of Matthew Beck, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “The inmates who year after year help protect our communities from the devastation of fires perform a valuable public service, and it is a tragic event when we lose one of them.”

Beck, who was assigned to the Alder Conservation Camp in Del Norte County, was received from Los Angeles County in May 2014 and was serving a six-year sentence for burglary. He is the fourth inmate firefighter to die since the conservation program was created in the 1940s.

Approximately 3,900 inmates, all volunteers, are housed in 43 conservation camps operated by CDCR, in conjunction with CALFIRE, the state of California’s wild land firefighting agency, and the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Working in crews of 12 to 17 fire crew members, CDCR firefighters often work in rugged back country using hand tools to cut containment lines to stop the spread of wildland fires.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Pelican Bay State Prison investigating attack on officers

CRESCENT CITY ― Pelican Bay State Prison (PBSP) officials are investigating an incident that sent eight officers to the hospital with injuries.

At 10:25 a.m. today, custody staff responded to a fistfight between two inmates on the B Facility maximum-security general population yard. Responding staff used chemical agents and batons to subdue the inmates; however, they refused to stop fighting.

As staff continued to try to subdue the two inmates, large groups of inmates from various areas of the yard ran toward the incident. The officers were overwhelmed as the inmates started attacking them. Officers from three armed posts used lethal force to stop the attacks firing a total of 19 .223 rounds from the mini-14 rifle and three 40-millimeter direct impact rounds.

Two inmate-made weapons were recovered; however, it does not appear at this time they were used in the attack.

Eight staff members were taken to an outside hospital with injuries. Six were treated and released and two are still hospitalized. Their injuries are significant but not life-threatening and they are expected to be released soon.

Seven inmates were also taken to outside hospitals, five of them for treatment of gunshot wounds.

PBSP officials have limited inmate movement throughout the entire institution to facilitate their investigation and they rehoused 97 inmates in the Administrative Segregation Unit.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sent a Deadly Force Investigations Team to the prison to conduct the criminal and administrative investigation into the use of deadly force. CDCR is also sending investigators from its Office of Correctional Safety. The Office of the Inspector General was notified.

The Peer Support Program was activated. The program ensures CDCR employees involved in work-related critical incidents are provided with intervention and resources to cope with the traumatic effects.

PBSP, located in Del Norte County, is comprised of two maximum-security facilities, two security housing unit facilities, a minimum-support facility and a short-term restricted housing unit. The prison provides treatment for mentally ill inmates and provides work, academic, career technical education, self-help and other rehabilitative programs. PBSP also has a firehouse with eight fulltime inmate firefighters. PBSP opened in 1989, currently houses approximately 2,000 inmates and employs approximately 1,300 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                         
MAY 24, 2017  

Contact: Lt. Jessica Berg
(707) 465-9040
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